Prayer Focus
Click here to watch THE HOPE on-line!

Baby Boy

MPAA Rating: R for strong sexuality, language, violence, and some drug use
Extremely Offensive
Add to your list?
View your list
Moviemaking Quality:

Primary Audience:
Adults
Genre:
Crime Romance Drama
Length:
2 hr. 10 min.
Year of Release:
2001
USA Release:
June 29, 2001
Relevant Issues
Scene from “Baby Boy”
Featuring: Tyrese Gibson, Omar Gooding, A.J. Johnson, Snoop Dogg, Taraji P. Henson
Director: John Singleton
Producer: John Singleton, Paul Hall
Distributor: Columbia Tristar

Here’s what we’ve heard about this film…

Here’s what the distributor says about their film: (from the producer) From director John Singleton (BOYZ N THE HOOD) comes BABY BOY, starring Tyrese Gibson and Snoop Doggy Dog. The film picks up where BOYZ left off, following the daily life, relationships, and conflicts of a young man who’s unemployed, living with his mother, with two love interests: his wife and his girlfriend.


Viewer Comments
This movie is a very edgy movie for Christians because there is foul language, mistreatment of women, and some sexual themes and violence in the movie. However, I thought the plot of the movie was overall very good. I thought Tyrese and A.J. Johnson were great actors. I felt the movie accurately depicts how life can be hard for those living in inner cities. And how individuals can be influenced by the environments they live in. It is a rather realistic plot, in my opinion. And let’s face it, this type of thing goes on in the real world. I would recommend it only to mature individuals who know what this type of movie entails ahead of time. This movie is by far not a family film and would only tell those adults who can differentiate good acting from the heavy subject matter. And, the subject matter can be rather racy!
My Ratings: [Very Offensive / 4]
—Kahime Abrams, age 22
Movie Critics
…several sex scenes often accompanied by very explicit sexual invitations and comments… More than 130 F-words…
—Kids-in-Mind
…“Baby Boy” is about… a young man who refuses to grow up. This is symptomatic of many males in the black community, Singleton insists…
—Kirk Honeycutt, The Hollywood Reporter
…Alternately overbearing and deft, somber and funny…
—Cynthia Fuchs, Pop Matters