Prayer Focus


MPAA Rating: R for sexual content, pervasive language and brief strong violence
not reviewed
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Moviemaking Quality:

Primary Audience:
Adults Teens
Crime Romance Comedy
2 hr. 1 min.
Year of Release:
Copyright, Columbia Pictures
Copyright, Columbia Pictures
Copyright, Columbia Pictures
Copyright, Columbia Pictures

Starring: Ben Affleck, Jennifer Lopez, Justin Bartha, Al Pacino, Christopher Walken | Directed by: Martin Brest | Produced by: MJohn Hardy, Casey Silver, Martin Brest | Written by: Martin Brest | Distributor: Columbia Pictures

This character piece tells the story of Gigli (Affleck), a hit man in Los Angeles eternally looking for the big score. His latest scheme is the kidnapping of the mentally challenged brother (Bartha) of a powerful district attorney. Successfully getting the brother to his seedy apartment, Gigli teams up with a woman (Lopez) he presumes to be in the business as well… is she; and will Gigli get away with this?

Viewer CommentsSend your comments
Negative—I didn’t read up enough on this movie before viewing it. I didn’t realize that Jennifer Lopez plays a lesbian in the film. Homosexuality was displayed as an accepted lifestyle. The film used the f-word at least 90-100 times during the two hours; sometimes 4 times in one sentence. The language was very, very offensive. There were also very strong sexual references to body parts. The mentally handicapped boy that is kidnapped uses very bad language and is very focused on sex. Besides these morally offensive things, the story itself was very boring and slow. I would not recommend this movie to anyone.
My Ratings: [Extremely Offensive / 1]
—Linda Blekking, age 46
Negative—I repented after watching this movie. I liked Jennifer Lopez and Ben Aflec so I thought it would be a good movie. The movie glorified homosexual lifestyle and the language was sewer language. I doubt I will watch another movie with either actor in it because they degraded themselves with acting in a movie with such degrading parts. This is not a movie for any decent person and especially not a Christian.
My Ratings: [Extremely Offensive/3]
—Diana Davis, age 55
Movie Critics
…Sex/Nudity: Extreme; Profanity: Extreme; Violence: Heavy; Blood/Gore: Heavy; Disrespectful/Bad Attitude: Extreme…
…“f” word… used excessively—over 100 times… profanity, sexually suggestive dialogue and action, homosexual conduct, nudity and violence prevent…
—Preview Family Movie and TV Review
…Vulgarity and banality… obscene content (in the violence, sexual and language categories)…
—Steven Isaac, Plugged In!, Focus on the Family
…really, really wretched… such an embarrassment for Affleck and co-star Jennifer Lopez that they should combine their resources to buy up every print and burn them, ceremonially, and spread the ashes over the Pacific Coast Highway, where the movie finally, mercifully, ends…
—Bill Muller, The Arizona Republic
…blood and organic matter spray into and on a fish tank where we see fish nibbling at the pieces… man cuts the thumb off a dead body with a plastic knife… woman describes (in detail) to a group of young men how to use the fingers to pull out an eye ball and leave the victim with no visual memories… [etc.]
…one of the worst movies I’ve seen in a long time… premise is ridiculous and the dialogue… is probably the most profane, obscene and absolutely horrendous exchange of banter between two characters that I’ve listened to…
—Holly McClure, Crosswalk
…So bad it verges on the legendary…
—Eleanor Ringel Gillespie, Atlanta Journal-Constitution
…And the dialogue—sweet, screaming Jehosephat, it’s awful…
—Margaret A. McGurk, Cincinnati Enquirer
…Nearly as unwatchable as it is unpronounceable…
—Manohla Dargis, Los Angeles Times
…a stinker…
—Jonathan Foreman, New York Post
…hopelessly misconceived…
—A.O. Scott, New York Times
…jaw-droppingly awful…
—Peter Travers, Rolling Stone
…the most thoroughly joyless and inept film of the year, and one of the worst of the decade…
—Mick LaSalle, San Francisco Chronicle
…the rare movie that never seems to take off, but also never seems to end…
—Claudia Puig, USA Today