Prayer Focus
Movie Review

Waiting

MPAA Rating: R for strong crude and sexual humor, pervasive language and some drug use

Reviewed by: Sheri McMurray
CONTRIBUTOR

Extremely Offensive
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Moviemaking Quality:

Primary Audience:
Adults
Genre:
Comedy
Length:
1 hr. 33 min.
Year of Release:
2005
Copyright, Lions Gate Films
Copyright, Lions Gate Films
Copyright, Lions Gate Films
Copyright, Lions Gate Films
Copyright, Lions Gate Films
Copyright, Lions Gate Films
Copyright, Lions Gate Films
Copyright, Lions Gate Films
Relevant Issues
Copyright, Lions Gate Films

Every time you buy a movie ticket or rent a video you are casting a vote telling Hollywood “That’s what I want.” Why does Hollywood continue to promote immoral programming? Are YOU part of the problem?

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Featuring: Ryan Reynolds, Justin Long, Anna Faris, David Koechner, John Francis Daley
Director: Rob McKittrick
Producer: Adam Rosenfelt, Stavros Merjos, Jay Rifkin
Distributor: Lions Gate Films

No one’s gonna make it big here.

Save your money. I can tell you right now that ALL Christian families should stay miles away from this one! It is a real stinker!

There is so much filthy language in this film that I could not stay up with it. There are a million references to lurid subjects such as: men’s genitals, women’s genitals’ sex with under age girls, sex with lesbian over tones, sex in the bathroom of a restaurant, drinking, smoking dope, parties, parties and more parties.

The basic story is about a couple of guys who are friends and have jobs at the same restaurant as waiters. They hang out with everyone who works there—the cooks, the hostess, the other waitresses, and the bus boys. Every character in this script lacks redeeming qualities, except perhaps for the guy whom the basic story revolves around, although he says and does some off-the-wall things, too.

Dean (Justin Long who is a pretty fine young actor) is fed up with being a waiter and wants to show his Mom he can be better after hearing his high school friend, Chet, has just graduated college with a great future in business. He is offered the assistant manager position at Shenanigan’s (think Chili’s crossed with Bennigan’s), but has a hard time deciding if this is the right move for him.

His best friend, Monty (Ryan Reynolds) is a real “a**hole” and is very proud of it. He runs the underbelly of the place with a horrible right of passage called “The Game” (something you definitely DO NOT wanna know about!). The movie serves up raunchy comedy focusing on Dean’s making a decision about his life that will affect his future. The story also revolves around one day in the life of a new waiter trainee named Mitch, who Monty takes to the utmost limits, doing horrible things to and around him, akin to Fraternity hazing but with a sickening twist on perversion taken to an all new barf level.

R is the limit to which they have rated movies, but I sure wish they had another grade for this one—it goes way off the lewd meter! I could fill up paragraphs with all the vulgar explicatives in “Waiting,” some of which I could not figure out how to print here without totally grossing you out—so I will give you just a hint: In the worst scene, the cooks spit in the food they are preparing for an extremely obnoxious customer. They rub the garlic bread they are about to serve her on their genitals, they put pubic hair in the gravy on her potatoes and drop her steak on the disgustingly filthy floor, then put it back on her plate. In another scene the male cast show their testicles to the girls, then one of the girls lifts up her skirt, and we are subject to a full frontal close up! I kept screaming in my mind—“God, get me outta here, please!”

If I didn’t have to review this movie, I would have been running from the theater within the first five minutes! It was lewd, crude and rude.

The theme song for the entire world today might go something like this—“I can’t get No Satisfaction.” However, the Bible reveals that whoever saves his life will loose it, but whoever loses his life will find it. Happiness is what we hunger and thirst after, but it only ends in misery when living lives like the people depicted in “Waiting.”

The hunger and thirsting should only be after God and his truly abundant satisfaction. We must discover Jesus and the pains of this world will be over—treat the disease—not the pain. Superficial pleasures all will leave you hungry still. These people are looking to be free from the bondage of sin in their lives, they don’t know Jesus therefore will never be satisfied. God will bring you to the lowest to get you to search for His Highest—to search for Him.

If I knew someone like any of these poor demented characters in real life, you better believe I would tell them the wonderful Good News, that Jesus has all the answers for their search for happiness and forgiveness of their most horrible sins, that Jesus will lead them to ultimate change and true satisfaction.

This movie is not worth the film it was printed on! “Waiting” is just an expensive excuse to be extremely rude and repulsive.

Violence: Mild / Profanity: Extreme / Sex/Nudity: Extreme

See list of Relevant Issues—questions-and-answers.

Year of Release—2005 / USA release: October 7, 2005 (wide).

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Movie Critics
…[1/4]… sophomorically crude…
—New York Post, Lou Lumenick
…takes vulgarity too far… one of the worst films of the year…
—Preview Family Movie and TV Review, Shaun Daugherty
…a moderately disgusting comedy… shoddy production values…
—Entertainment Weekly, Gregory Kirschling
…could have been a funny movie…
—Chicago Tribune, Allison Benedikt
…[1½/4] The characters in “Waiting”… seem like types, not people. What they do and say isn’t funny because someone real doesn’t seem to be doing or saying it…
—Chicago Sun-Times, Roger Ebert
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