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Movie Review

Sex and the City: The Movie a.k.a. “Sexo e a Cidade,” “Sinkkuelämää”

MPAA Rating: R for strong sexual content, graphic nudity and language

Reviewed by: Rachel Langer

Extremely Offensive
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Moviemaking Quality:

Primary Audience:
Romance, Comedy, Adaptation
2 hr. 15 min.
Year of Release:
USA Release:
May 30, 2008
Copyright, New Line Cinema, a division of Warner Brothers Entertainment Copyright, New Line Cinema, a division of Warner Brothers Entertainment Copyright, New Line Cinema, a division of Warner Brothers Entertainment Copyright, New Line Cinema, a division of Warner Brothers Entertainment Copyright, New Line Cinema, a division of Warner Brothers Entertainment Copyright, New Line Cinema, a division of Warner Brothers Entertainment Copyright, New Line Cinema, a division of Warner Brothers Entertainment Copyright, New Line Cinema, a division of Warner Brothers Entertainment Copyright, New Line Cinema, a division of Warner Brothers Entertainment Copyright, New Line Cinema, a division of Warner Brothers Entertainment
Relevant Issues
Copyright, New Line Cinema, a division of Warner Brothers Entertainment

Marriage in the Bible

How can I deal with temptations? Answer

Should I save sex for marriage? Answer

How far is too far? What are the guidelines for dating relationships? Answer

What are the consequences of sexual immorality? Answer


Is formalized marriage becoming obsolete? Answer
Many people are convinced that traditional marriages don’t work and that this practice should be abandoned. What does the Bible say about marriage?

True love

Couple in love. Photo copyrighted
What is true love and how do you know when you have found it? Answer

Sex, Love and Relationships
Learn how to make your love the best it can be. Discover biblical answers to questions about sex, marriage, sexual addictions, and more.
Featuring: Sarah Jessica Parker, Kim Cattrall, Cynthia Nixon, Kristin Davis, Chris Noth, Jason Lewis, Jennifer Hudson, Amy Flanagan, Evan Handler, Willie Garson, David Eigenberg, Lynn Cohen, Mario Cantone, Bridget Regan, Julie Halston, Polina Frantsena, Michael Bloomberg, Gilles Marini
Director: Michael Patrick King
Producer: Richard Brener, Eric M. Cyphers, Jonathan Filley, Michael Patrick King, John P. Melfi, Sarah Jessica Parker, Tiffany Hayzlett Parker, Melinda Relyea, Darren Star
Distributor: New Line Cinema, a division of Warner Brothers Entertainment

Prequel to

Sequel to Sex and the City 2 (2010)

Remember Carrie Bradshaw, Samantha Jones, Miranda Hobbes and Charlotte York? If you have never watched an episode of “Sex And The City,” then these names may mean nothing to you, but, to thousands of women, these four are the soldiers on the front lines for single women everywhere, answering their questions, making the mistakes, and, of course, testing out the shoes.

The film adaptation of this critically acclaimed television show picks up several years after we left Carrie and the gals in Manhattan. Carrie Bradshaw is a columnist turned non-fiction author who has made her living writing about the single scene in New York City, focusing on sex and relationships. We left her in an on and off long-term relationship with Mr. Big, that despite more than one breakup, has spanned a decade. Carrie and her three best friends Samantha, Miranda, and Charlotte are all in various stages of their thirties and forties, as well as in varying degrees of relationships, when Carrie announces that she and Mr. Big have decided to tie the knot.

The film chronicles Carrie as she prepares for her wedding to a man who has been labeled the Mr. Big of commitment-phobics throughout six years of episodic television. When the wedding day arrives, and Big doesn’t show, Carrie must deal with the aftermath of a very public flop. Samantha, supporting Carrie from distant Los Angeles begins to reevaluate her commitment to her partner, a much younger television star who supported her through chemotherapy. Miranda decides whether or not to try and breathe some life into her failing marriage, while Charlotte faces her fears that something terrible is around the corner, coming to mar her fairy tale happiness.

It is obvious by the title and rating of this film that it deals with some very mature subject matter. Anyone who has caught so much as a glimpse of the episodes will realize that all four characters lead a lifestyle open to many sexual partners with very little relational pretext. These women pride themselves on living in Manhattan in the age of sexual revolution, where women treat sex the same way many men do, while still maintaining their femininity. The film contains full frontal and rear nudity of both men and women, and gratuitous sex and profanity throughout.

While it was exciting to see marriage being celebrated in this film, the motive for marriage was not a long standing monogamous commitment, rather a legal convenience. Even as each party began to realize that they wished to be committed to each other, there was a lack of emphasis on the sanctity of the wedding vows. Relationships were often self-focused and dysfunctional.

The emphasis on friendship is probably the best thing that this film has to offer (aside from the designer purses). The unconditional love that these four women offer each other is inspiring. It bodes the response that, perhaps, if they gave the same to their relationships, the outcomes may be a little less bleak. It seems, however, that they are content to rely on each other and treat men as the extras to their four-way love story.

Anyone who is a fan of the television series will probably enjoy seeing this film, as the characters remain pleasantly consistent, and the dialogue is equally as witty as it was throughout the episodes. The amount of high fashion is phenomenal and the film is a great place to find your next wish-list Manolo Blahnik’s (that’s Vogue for shoes, in case you weren’t sure). The plot fell a little flat at points and the narration (pinnacle in the series) seemed to grasp for substance in some moments. That being said, the writers tackled the monstrous challenge of adapting an episodic thirty-minute TV show for the big screen, and succeeded.

I would not recommend this film to anyone who is easily offended by lewd behavior, language, or nudity, as it contains plenty.

Violence: Minor / Profanity: Heavy / Sex/Nudity: Extreme

Every time you buy a movie ticket or rent a video you are casting a vote telling Hollywood “That’s what I want.” Why does Hollywood continue to promote immoral programming? Are YOU part of the problem?

Sex, Love and Relationships
Learn how to make your love the best it can be. Christian answers to questions about sex, marriage, sexual addictions, and more.

See list of Relevant Issues—questions-and-answers.

Viewer CommentsSend your comments
Comments below:
Negative—This is a grossly indecent film. Well done to the couple of Christians who have made a stand and not watched it for entertainment. I wish there were more of you around! …Real actors engaged in real sexual activity on-screen to produce this film. A real penis is shown, so are real breasts. In creating this film, actual genital contact was involved. Pay at the box office to watch this entertainment, and you are sponsoring and perhaps even endorsing the activity of the actors. Shouldn't the Christians object? Seems like the opposite is happening. Who knows, perhaps the actors are themselves Christians.

By the way, I have absolutely no criticism of the non-Christians who watch this stuff for entertainment. They don't subscribe to God's values, nor do they pretend to. Christians on the other hand do (I think). Are the Christians the ones pretending?
My Ratings: Moral rating: Extremely Offensive / Moviemaking quality: 1
—John Kirk, age 40
Negative—C'mon, this movie was written and directed by a well-known homosexual man, first 5 minutes show two men kissing on the sidewalk in Mid-town Manhattan and one of the gals makes a comment about having a bad taste “in her mouth from some guys _____!” Reprobates, sickening.
My Ratings: Moral rating: Extremely Offensive / Moviemaking quality: 1½
—Tom, age 38
Positive—This movie was enjoyable. Yes, it had some very raw visuals that you would not want anyone to see that gets offended as it is pretty graphic. It is especially not a children's movie. The acting was good and the story plot was okay. It's “Sex in the City” girls. A story about one of them getting married, things don't turn out as she had planned, goes away with her friends and eventually gets married. There is a whole a lot of stories in between, each lady going through something and how they were dealing with men relationships. I feel the “sex” scenes, which were embarrassing, could have been eliminated, but they were short. It is not a Christian movie in the least, very very worldly. If your going to see it and not trying to get a Christian message out of it, then to you it would be entertaining… and it is definitely a “chick” flick.
My Ratings: Moral rating: Offensive / Moviemaking quality: 4
—Donnam, age 52


Comments from non-viewers
Negative—Why would a Christian see this? Why would someone who loves Christ and Christ's morals go see something like this? What is wrong with Christians today that going to see a profane and immoral show is nothing less than the norm? How can we love something that God hates? Or is it really God that we hate, because we care so much about our Earthly entertainment that we follow the lusts of the flesh instead of God? I don't understand, and I pray that every Christian will not sin in the eyes of God by going to see a movie like this.
—Jen, age 17
I have not seen this movie yet, and I am never going to for that matter, but I am posting this comment to warn all Christians against it. If you need an explanation, just look at the rating! The Bible commands us in 2 Chronicles 7:19 to not forsake his statutes or commands. The seventh commandment is “Thou shalt not commit adultery.” And even though we are not breaking this commandment physically when we watch this movie, the Bible says in Matthew 5:28-29, 'But I tell you that anyone who LOOKS at a woman lustfully has already committed adultery with her in his heart. If your right eye causes you to sin, gouge it out and throw it away'. Those are some very strong words against the things that this movie promotes. Please think about this carefully, and remember what someone else once said on this Web site, “Every time you buy a ticket, you are telling Hollywood that this is what you want.” So I pose you with a final question… Is this what we want, but more importantly is this what God wants?
—Richard, age 32

Perfectly stated, Richard, age 32. Thank you so much for your wisdom. There's really no question as to whether to see this movie or not see this movie if you truly live for the Lord.
—Susan, age 41

Movie Critics
…raunchy… decadent… uninhibited worship of the flesh or the material. …
—Phil Boatwright, Preview Family Movie and TV Review
…A little Botox goes a long way in ‘Sex and the City,’ but a little decent writing would have gone even further. A dumpy big-screen makeover…
—Manohla Dargis, The New York Times
…For fashionistas only… ‘Sex’ more about duds than drama… If you find a humping dog absolutely hilarious, you are going to love this movie. …
—James Verniere, Boston Herald
…Even more than on the TV series, the movie is more about style than substance. …most of the plot turns can be guessed well before they happen. The movie's nearly 2½ hours are padded with wardrobe change montages that could test the nerves of even the most die-hard fashionista. Most disappointing is the paucity of clever quips…
—Claudia Puig, USA Today
…Although there is still plenty to laugh about, the conversation is more genuine and mature, the cuts deeper when friends unintentionally wound or disappointment or anger rages. Even the idea of fairy-tale endings gets a new examination, as does the continuing theme about being true to yourself. …
—Barbara Vancheri, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
…a funny, sappy, clumsy, crude, rambunctious, argumentative, gleefully vulgar attempt to balance the fantasy of romance with the reality that the fantasy is impossible. … filmmaking that's often only a notch above ‘Harold and Kumar Escape From Guantanamo Bay.’…
—Wesley Morris, Boston Globe