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Movie Review

Split Infinity

Reviewed by: Debbie James

Moviemaking Quality:

Primary Audience:
8 to Adult
90 min.
Not rated

This movie was produced specifically for Feature Films For Families, an organization dedicated to providing wholesome films for viewing by the entire family without having to worry about the profanity, sexual content, or graphic violence that is so common, even in “family films” of today.

“SPLIT INFINITY” strongly enforces the belief that family is more important than worldly possessions. A.J. Knowlton (Melora Slover) is a driven 14-yr-old entrepreneur obsessed with becoming rich and wearing all the right clothes. A.J. obviously loves her family, but she is embarrassed by the way they dress. They try to help her see that love of family is more important than anything else, but she is not convinced. She is a little resentful towards her grandfather for losing the family farm during the depression, as she believes that is what has kept them from being wealthy.

One night, A.J. falls from the hayloft, and is transported back in time to 1929, when her grandfather, Frank (Trevor Black), is a young man. A.J. is now his teenage sister Amelia Jean. What she discovers about her grandpa helps to reshape her values.

“SPLIT INFINITY” has many strong biblical elements, such as: God is attributed to working all things, both good and bad, for our good; a scripture verse hangs on a wall; love and respect of family are demonstrated; true friendship, beauty, and riches are identified; and grandpa utters a brief prayer to God.

I have recommended this movie for 8 to adult because the time travel and worldly values themes might not be understood by younger children. Other reasons are: A teacher displays exaggerated meanness and spanks children with a paddle, and disrespect is shown towards this teacher, but is rebuked. The only “bad” language is one use of the word “darn,” and a few uses of the name-calling terms “geek,” “dweeb,” and “hussy.” There is also a brief scene of a boy/girl equality argument.

Year of Release—1992