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program reviews


Moral Rating: Avoid
Primary Audience: Teen to Adult
Genre: Drama
Length: 1 hr.


    Starring: Kim Delaney, Tom Everett Scott, Kyle Secor, Rick Hoffman, Diana Maria-Riva, Scotty Leavenworth | Produced by: Steven Bochco, Paramount Network Television, and ABC

Show Synopsis: (from the producer) From executive producer Steven Bochco comes an irreverent, fast-paced drama series starring NYPD Blue's Kim Delaney. Emmy Award-winner Delaney portrays Kathleen Maguire, who is a year out of law school and steadily building her reputation as a tough, no-nonsense defense attorney in the weathered courtrooms of Philadelphia's City Hall. She owns her own firm—often representing repeat offenders—and finds herself in a world unto itself. It appears that the judges, witnesses, lawyers, cops, and even the perpetrators are not immune to the exhausting grind of the criminal justice system.

Kim Delaney in 'Philly' After her law partner is shipped off to the sanitarium following weeks on a pill-fed fad diet, Kathleen encounters the charmingly scrappy lawyer, Will Froman (Tom Everett Scott). The opportunistic Froman, who desperately wants out of the Public Defender's office, convinces Kathleen that she needs him to help with her now-doubled caseload. Seriously out of options, Kathleen reluctantly agrees—even though this partnership might not be one made in heaven…

Viewer Comments   

Usually OK—I thought this show might be a bit "too much" from the promos, but it has turned out to be one of my favorites. Really delves into the the mind and the struggles of every day people and those in high positions. It keeps you on the edge of your seat, and is well written and well acted by Kim Delaney, Tom Everett Scott, and the rest of the cast!
   —Megan, age 22

"…Newly “acceptable” prime-time vulgarities "d--k," "b--ch" and "t-ts" all make their way into the script more than once…obscene gestures…"
   —Steven Isaac, "Plugged In", Focus on the Family